Treatments provided by Simon Marsh

Mr Marsh is an expert consultant offering an extensive range of treatments to private patients in a modern, safe environment.

Treatments, operations and tests

Biopsies take a small sample of tissue from the breast for analysis. There are a number of methods depending on the growth: Fine needle biopsies are used on fluid filled lumps to drain the abscess. Core-Needle biopsies are a local anaesthetic procedure to take a sample of the breast tissue using a hollow needle. Surgical Biopsies are also local anaesthetic procedures, performed by a surgeon, and remove the lump through a series of small incisions. After a biopsy, the sample can be analysed for cancerous cells.
Lumpectomy (aka: tylectomy) is a common surgical procedure designed to remove a discrete lump, usually a benign tumor or breast cancer, from an affected man or woman's breast. As the tissue removed is generally quite limited and the procedure relatively non-invasive, compared to a mastectomy, a lumpectomy is considered a viable means of "breast conservation" or "breast preservation" surgery with all the attendant physical and emotional advantages of such an approach.
Breast reconstruction surgery is an option after a mastectomy to balance out the appearance of the breasts. Beyond external prosthetics, there are two options, artificial implants can be surgically inserted into the breast or tissue can be transplanted from one area of the patient to the breast. A surgeon's top priority is to ensure a good match and surgery can extend to cosmetic work on the affected breast.
The aim is to treat any malignant disease in the breast. It is done by removing the breast. You will usually end up with a fine scar running across the chest wall. The breast and nipple can always be rebuilt, usually at a later date.The second aim is to find out whether there are malignant cells in the rest of the body. If so, then treatment with hormones or chemotherapy would be of help. Simply taking out the diseased part from the breast and using x-ray treatment for the rest of the breast is an alternative.
A breast biopsy is a procedure in which part or all of a suspicious breast growth is removed and examined, usually for the presence of cancer. The growth sample is suctioned out through a needle or cut out using a surgical procedure. The sample is then examined and evaluated under a microscope by a pathologist to identify non-cancerous (benign) or cancerous (malignant) tissue. Words used to refer to the abnormal area or growth before and after diagnosis may include lump, mass, lesion, and tumor. The basic aim of a breast biopsy is to determine whether or not a worrisome lump is cancer.
An epigastric hernia happens when a weakness in the abdominal muscle allows the tissues of the abdomen to protrude through the muscle. An epigastric hernia is usually present at birth, and may heal without treatment as the infant grows and the abdominal muscles strengthen. An epigastric hernia is similar to a umbilical hernia, except the umbilical hernia forms around the belly button and the epigastric hernia is usually between the belly button and the chest.
Femoral hernias occur just below the inguinal ligament, when abdominal contents pass through a naturally occurring weakness called the femoral canal. Femoral hernias are a relatively uncommon type, accounting for only 3% of all hernias. While femoral hernias can occur in both males and females, almost all of them develop in women because of the wider bone structure of the female pelvis. Femoral hernias are more common in adults than in children. Those that do occur in children are more likely to be associated with a connective tissue disorder or with conditions that increase intra-abdominal pressure.
A hernia is a weakness in the stomach or abdominal wall. There are various forms of treatment - open hernia surgery using a mesh to repair the weakness, and keyhole surgery which may enable you to return to normal activities sooner.
A hernia occurs when the abdominal muscle weakens, resulting in a bulge or tear through which tissue can be pressed and cause extreme pain. Laparoscopic techniques require a small incision and the insertion of a camera/tool to repair the hernia through surgical staples and patches. While the incision is minimal and generally performed as an outpatient procedure it requires a general anaesthetic.
The hernia pouch or sac is the lining of the inside of the tummy wall. It pushes through the weakness at the tummy button. The sac has a fatty covering and inside there may be bowel or fatty tissue called omentum. The sac steadily gets larger and can be painful. The bowel and omentum may get stuck in the sac. Their blood supply can be cut off and the bowel and omentum can strangulate and die. This causes vomiting, great pain and is very serious. Umbilical hernias are very common and easily treated, particularly when small. If treated when they are small, this will prevent strangulation and make the strongest repair.
A hernia occurs when the abdominal muscle weakens, resulting in a bulge or tear through which tissue can be pressed and cause extreme pain. Surgical intervention uses a single long incision to allow access to the site of the hernia where the bulge can be removed or pushed back into the abdominal cavity and the muscle walls repaired with stitches or patches depending on the size of the rupture.
A hernia occurs when the abdominal muscle weakens, resulting in a bulge or tear through which tissue can be pressed and cause extreme pain. Laparoscopic techniques require a small incision and the insertion of a camera/tool to repair the hernia through surgical staples and patches. While the incision is minimal and generally performed as an outpatient procedure it requires a general anaesthetic.