Treatments provided by Tony Jacob

Mr Jacob offers a range of ENT treatments for adults and children including submandibular gland drainage/excision and excission of thyroglossal cyst.

 

Treatments, operations and tests

Adenoidectomy is the surgical removal of the adenoids. They may be removed for several reasons, including impaired breathing through the nose and chronic infections or earaches. The surgery is common. It is most often done on an outpatient basis under general anesthesia. Post-operative pain is generally minimal and prevented with an abundance of icy or cold foods. The procedure can sometimes be combined with a tonsillectomy if needed.Adenoidectomy is not often performed on children aged 1-6, as adenoids help the body's immune system. Adenoids become vestigial organs in adults.
Adenoidectomy is the surgical removal of the adenoids. They may be removed for several reasons, including impaired breathing through the nose and chronic infections or earaches. The surgery is common. It is most often done on an outpatient basis under general anesthesia. Post-operative pain is generally minimal and prevented with an abundance of icy or cold foods. The procedure can sometimes be combined with a tonsillectomy if needed.Adenoidectomy is not often performed on children aged 1-6, as adenoids help the body's immune system. Adenoids become vestigial organs in adults.
Ear syringing, as the name implies, involves the use of a syringe to remove wax from the ears that seem to be blocked. In more details, this works by injecting water that is at body temperature into the ear canal through the nozzle of the syringe. With the very gentle force from the syringe, the water gets into the very deepest part of the ear canal and as this happens it forms a kind of miniature whirlpool of fluid which then helps to dislodge the wax. Apart from just dislodging the wax, the water eventually carries the wax out.
In the majority of cases, earwax falls out on its own without the need to remove it. However, if earwax is totally blocking your ear, or if any of the following symptoms are present, it may need to be removed: * hearing loss, * earache, * tinnitus (noises in your ear that come from an internal source), * vertigo (the feeling that you are moving while you are still), or * a cough. Treatment to remove an earwax plug usually starts with eardrops to soften the plug. If eardrops do not work, a process known as irrigation may be needed.
Hyperparathyroidism (and hypoparathyroidism) are rare hormone disorders caused by the parathyroid glands in the neck producing too little (hypo) or too much (hyper) parathyroid hormone. In the latter the parathyroid glands (there are 4) produce too much PTH. This causes blood calcium levels to rise (hypercalcaemia) and blood phosphorus levels to fall (hypophosphataemia). Hyperparathyroidism is diagnosed via a blood test which may show high levels of PTH, high levels of blood calcium low levels of phosphorus. Primary hyperparathyroidism can only be treated with surgery to remove the adenoma from the parathyroid gland. Following surgery, the patient should avoid a high-calcium diet and drink plenty of water to prevent dehydration.

Treatment of secondary hyperparathyroidism depends on the underlying cause. Kidney disease is the most common cause of secondary hyperparathyroidism. In some people where secondary hyperparathyroidism is caused by kidney disease, medication may be prescribed to manage the condition.

Insertion of grommets is a common operation carried out on children. It is performed to improve hearing or to reduce the frequency of ear infections, to solve the problem of "glue ear". A grommet is a small tube that is inserted into a hole that is made in the eardrum to allow air to pass into the middle ear. A small cut is made in the eardrum, the fluid is drained out and a tube or grommet is inserted. The operation is usually done as a day case under a general anaesthetic.
Laryngoscopy is an examination that allows a doctor to look at the back of your throat, your voice box (larynx) and vocal cords with a scope called laryngoscope. There are two types of laryngoscopy, and each uses different equipment. Indirect laryngoscopy is performed in a doctor’s surgery using a small hand mirror which is held at the back of the throat. Your doctor shines a light in your mouth and wears a mirror on his or her head to reflect the light to the back of your throat. L aryngoscopy (flexible or rigid) lets a doctor see deeper into the throat. The scope is either flexible or rigid. Flexible scopes show the throat better and are more comfortable for the patient.
Polypectomy is the surgical removal of polyps (abnormal inflammatory tissue growths) that are located in the nasal passages. If polyps recur, it may be necessary to remove polyps from the deeper ethmoid, sphenoid, and maxillary sinus linings to provide longer-lasting relief. The polyps originate near the ethmoid sinuses (located at the top of the nose on both sides of the nasal cavity) and grow into the open areas of the nasal cavity. Large polyps can obstruct the airway and block drainage from the sinuses. Sinus infections can result from fluid accumulating in the blocked sinuses..
Branchial Cleft Cysts are congenital cysts, that arise in the lateral aspect of the neck when the second branchial cleft fails to close during embryonic development. These arches and clefts contribute to the formation of various structures of the head and neck. Branchial cleft cysts are the most common of congenital neck masses. They are bilateral in about 2-3% of the cases. Usually, they do not appear at birth, but become noticeable much later in life. If they get infected, they may form a deep neck abscess or a draining fistula. The treatment of branchial cleft cysts is surgical excision.
Septoplasty is a corrective surgical procedure done to straighten the nasal septum, the partition between the two nasal cavities. Ideally, the septum should run down the center of the nose. When it deviates into one of the cavities, it narrows that cavity and impedes airflow. Often the inferior turbinate on the opposite side enlarges, which is termed compensatory hypertrophy. Nasal obstructions caused by serious deviations frequently lead to chronic sinus problems. Turbinate reduction may also be advised to further enlarge the nasal cavities.
There are different types of Parathyroidectomy. Minimally invasive parathyroidectomy: You may receive a shot of a very small amount of radioactive tracer before this surgery. This helps highlight the diseased glands. This will allow your surgeon to use a special probe, like a Geiger counter, to locate the parathyroid gland. Your surgeon will make a small cut on one side of your neck, and then remove the diseased gland through it. This procedure takes about 1 hour.

There are different types of Parathyroidectomy. Minimally invasive parathyroidectomy: You may receive a shot of a very small amount of radioactive tracer before this surgery. This helps highlight the diseased glands. This will allow your surgeon to use a special probe, like a Geiger counter, to locate the parathyroid gland. Your surgeon will make a small cut on one side of your neck, and then remove the diseased gland through it. This procedure takes about 1 hour. Endoscopic parathyroidectomy: Your surgeon will make two or three small cuts in the front of your neck and one cut above the top of your collarbone to remove any diseased parathyroid glands discovered with the endocscopy. This method reduces visible scarring, pain, and recovery time.

The parotid gland is the largest of the salivary glands. There are two parotid glands, one on each side of the face, just below and to the front of the ear. A duct through which saliva is secreted runs from each gland to the inside of the cheek.The main purpose of parotidectomy is to remove abnormal growths (neoplasms) that occur in the parotid gland. Parotid gland neoplasms may be benign (approximately 80%) or malignant. Tumors may spread from other areas of the body, entering the parotid gland by way of the lymphatic system.
The salivary(submandibular) gland is removed under a general anaesthetic The procedure usually takes approximately 1 hour. It involves a cut around two inches long in the upper part of the neck just below the jaw line. If the gland is being removed because of infection that is caused by a stone it may also be necessary to make a cut inside the mouth to remove that stone. Once the gland has been removed the wound is closed with stitches. At the end of the operation a small tube is usually placed through the skin into the underlying wound to drain any blood, which is usually removed the morning after surgery.
Ankyloglossia, commonly known as tongue tie, is a congenital oral anomaly which may decrease mobility of the tongue tip[1] and is caused by an unusually short, thick lingual frenulum, a membrane connecting the underside of the tongue to the floor of the mouth.[2] Ankyloglossia varies in degree of severity from mild cases characterized by mucous membrane bands to complete ankyloglossia whereby the tongue is tethered to the floor of the mouth. The operation aims to smooth out the bone, effectively making the space larger and so decreasing pressure on the tendons.
Tonsillectomy is a common operation in childhood. Enlarged tonsils may cause chronic or recurrent sore throat, and upper airway obstruction causing difficulty with swallowing. Tonsillectomy is a surgical procedure performed to remove the tonsils.
Tonsillectomy is a common operation in childhood. Enlarged tonsils may cause chronic or recurrent sore throat, and upper airway obstruction causing difficulty with swallowing. Tonsillectomy is a surgical procedure performed to remove the tonsils.